Red Lungs

Getting ready to set up a whole kiln load of glaze tests to fix my misbehaving ame (iron/ash) glaze, and realize that I’m out one very important ingredient, red ochre collected from a place right here in Taku. Completely forgot that I had used the last of it in my last glaze batch mixed up a couple months ago. Doh!

So…. Delay the mixing of test glazes for tiles and cups, I had to spend the day crushing and sieving red ochre. I haven’t used my man powered stamp mill in a while, and I added too much material to the mortar. My wooden pestle (4 foot long pole) that I use to stamp the material was just not up to the task because it was too light to sink down into the material and get it circulating in the mortar.  To remedy this, I retrofitted one of my wooden pestles with some  3cm diameter round steel bar left over from a long piece of bar I cut into sections for my kiln’s grate bars.

This new pestle worked really great, so great in fact, that material was flying out of the mortar from the striking force. So I proceeded to cut down a large cardboard box to keep most of that stuff from flying out or away. It is really hard work digging it, carting it around, and crushing it, I hate to lose any at all.

So anyway, here are some pictures of today’s festivities, and I did wear a dust mask, so I don’t have to worry about getting red lungs…

Mortar full of material, big chunks.
Mortar full of material, big chunks.

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My two 'pestles'
My two ‘pestles’
retrofitting with steel bars
retrofitting with steel bars
Now we're in business!
Now we’re in business!
Things moving along nicely now.
Things moving along nicely now.
Sieving. This is one of the jobs I dislike the most.
Sieving. This is one of the jobs I dislike the most.
This bucketful is sieved through 50 mesh. Before using it, I will re-sieve through 80 mesh, most likely.
This bucketful is sieved through 50 mesh. Before using it, I will re-sieve through 80 mesh, most likely.

One thought on “Red Lungs”

  1. Hello Mike: I stumbled on your website today. I am in Karatsu with my husband. We are going to Imari tomorrow. I am a potter (not professionally) and a tea ceremony person. I have been visiting kilns and talking to gallery owners about chosen karatsu. I found your discussion of warabai which seemed definitive. I was talking to a gallery owner today about changes in the Karatsu clay. You seem on the right track working from the stone. I am fully intimidated by your hard work. Best, Jennifer

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