Tag Archives: wood kiln

Fall 2014 Wood Firing Continued

The unloaded pots have now been hammered, moved inside the studio, or are getting refired. The ones that have been moved inside the studio are starting to get cleaned up and polished, in preparation for next spring’s shows.

All in all, there were some 750+- pots in this load. I’m not sure of an exact number because I started smashing before I had a count.

Here are some of the pots that I started cleaning up today. Most of them are small  dishes, ranging from 10 – 17cm across.  All sizes listed are width, and are approximate measurements.

2014 Fall Firing: Unloading the Kiln

Here are images from Saturday’s unloading of the kiln.  Some good, some bad, but mostly good.

Most problems came from mistakes made with clay or glazes, the firing of the kiln was exactly how I planned… first time ever.

Got a nice gradient from about cone 12-13 in front, to cone 6-7 in the back of the first chamber, and an overall cone 6-7 in the rear chamber.

Biggest problem was crawling of iron brushwork on raw ware. I will touch up bare spots and refire these.

Lost both big slabs, which both cracked BADLY.

Madara  and E-Madara items came out really nice overall, with lots of subtle blues.

E-Madara Karatsu Yunomi/Guinomi

This is an underglaze decorated madara glazed yunomi fired in the wood kiln in 2013. It was heavily reduced in the firing, resulting in the dark clay color and carbon trapping in the glaze.

It is a small yunomi, and could almost be called a large guinomi, and certainly has the character of a guinomi. People generally confuse guinomi with sakazuki (sake cups), but Guinomi are cups used for tea, sake, whiskey, etc…, that have a higher status among pots than yunomi, because they are usually one of a kind pieces, not made in large batches like yunomi usually are. Think of them as a sort of ‘mini chawan’.

Item size: approx.  7.5H x 6.0W cm

Price includes signed and stamped wood box.


Sold

Images from WIT2014

Workshop in Taku, 2014. This is what you get when a professional photographer runs wild, and is kind enough to share. Thank you Robert (Brad) Haughie!

 

Kickwheel Conversion Finished

The kickwheel conversion is finally finished. Here are some pictures of the flywheel getting put together:

Douglas Fir beams glued up and drying.  After drying, knocked the corners off with a chainsaw, then knocked off corners again to get a basically round shape.
Douglas Fir beams glued up and drying. After drying, knocked the corners off with a chainsaw, then knocked off corners again to get a basically round shape.
Corners knocked off, planed the edge to soften and round.
Corners knocked off, planed the edge to soften and round.
Planed and sanded, ready to go on the frame.
Planed and sanded, ready to go on the frame.
Placed on the frame, spun, and centered. Then, clamped on in place, turned over and screwed in (not shown)
Placed on the frame, spun, and centered. Then, clamped on in place, turned over and screwed in (not shown)
Reassembled and ready to go!
Reassembled and ready to go!

And it was just as easy as that.  Many thanks again to Yamaguchi kun for making the flywheel armature!

And here I am taking it out for a spin:

Trying Out Something New

I decided to try out a new form to put in the next firing. A clam shaped dish that is a sort of Karatsu standard. They are nothing special, and pretty much everyone makes them, so there seem to be MANY ways to get from point A to point B.

Ko-Karatsu Hamaguri Food Dishes 古唐津 蛤向付
Ko-Karatsu Hamaguri Food Dishes
古唐津 蛤向付

The first thing I always do when trying out something new, is look through my collection of old Karatsu ware pictures and books, to see if I can find an example, with measurements, of what I want to make. Well, this time around it seems that although everyone seems to be making them now, there are very few examples of this form recorded in Karatsu ware related books. Or at least the ones I have in my studio.

I managed to find the same 5 piece set of old Karatsu Hamaguri dishes (clam shaped dishes) in 3  different publications (above). And, none of them show the bottom of the dish, or a closeup of the folded lip that makes the clam shape. I made a few, tried cutting the lip and overlapping, pulling the lip up and folding over, and  a few more things, but all I ended up with were forms that just didn’t click.

Whenever I get stumped, I give my mentor a call. He usually has some advice that gets me out of my hole and gets me back on track. In this case, I asked him if there was some sort of not so obvious ‘trick’ involved in getting the shape right for this particular form. As usual, Tsuruta sensei gave me some very good advice, and even sent me some close up photographs, which helped a lot.  So, here’s what I came up with:

Now, I tried doing the bending and folding at various stages of drying and I’m here to tell you that it is best done when they are still sticky wet. I suppose it depends on your clay, but for the stuff we have around here, bending and folding is like asking for fate to show up in your studio with a big baseball bat.

That said, although it folded better when wet, it had a nasty habit of  unzipping vertically down the pot 10 minutes later. That’s where the extra blob of clay came in handy. It seems that not only is it decorative, but it also keeps the pot together until it stiffens up a bit. Who knew?!

Honestly, these are my favorite discoveries: when I find a decorative element that is actually not  a decorative element at all, but rather an important part of the process cleverly disguised as decoration.