Tag Archives: Pottery

Let them eat cake

Here is my latest pot porn for you: freshly stamp milled, slaked, and filter pressed cakes of Izumiyama porcelain. 150kg. 


Not for the faint of heart, Izumiyama is hard to work with. It is non plastic and likes to crack during drying, impossible for slab work, and deforms easily. And it costs more than twice as much as Amakusa porcelain from Kumamoto. Most porcelain artists in Arita and Imari switched to using Amakusa porcelain long ago because it’s much easier to work with, doesn’t crack, and fires whiter. 


BUT! The beauty of Izumiyama in the wood kiln is absolutely undeniable. It fires to a soft ivory white and blushes in very subtle shades of peach. The surface is deep and translucent and vitrifies as low as around 1230C. 

Tomorrow morning first thing, Peter the Pugger will be getting a major workout!

Shinot Noir

Warning: some Shino enthusiasts may find content in this post offensive and/or snarky. 

When I was in Korea this last  October, the subject of Shino came up. Shino, like Raku, Chawan, and Geisha, tends to have a different set of meanings and expectations, depending on who you are talking to (usually Japanese vs non-Japanese).

Most Shino enthusiasts in Japan get their pantaloons in a twist when they see this smooth orange, white, or carbon trapping glaze that most Americans call Shino. “Sore wa Shino janai” is a  common thing to hear when showing off your American Shino to a Japanese Shino lover.

In Japan, Shino is a combination of clay, glaze, and firing method. The definition is somewhat cramped , and leaves little wiggle room. Same with Raku, Chawan, and Geisha. There is all this history and tradition hanging on at the end of the label, foiling our attempts to  add new dimensions to the term.

Here’s the problem: The Shino purists are vastly outnumbered. Actually, I’m one of them (to a degree) but acknowledge that on the worldwide level, Shino means more  to a whole lot of world potters and enthusiasts. I really wish the word had not been co-opted by English, but it has, so oh well…

Embracing this trend, I have decided to widen the definition of Shino even further. Here are some examples:

Satin black Shino
Flowing matte white Shino
Soft blue Shino
Clear Shino
Bizen Shino
High silica Shino

Unglazed low fire Shino
Petroleum Flex Shino
 
Note:

(I do make a ‘Shino’ glaze, but do not call it Shino for fear of reprisal.)

Slab plates

This is one way I make slab plates. I posted the pictures to FB but am reposting here with descriptions of each step. You can adjust the steps if your clay is more or less forgiving than mine. 

First cut slabs and let them rest overnight to stiffen up some. These slabs are 10mm thick. 


Trim the slab with an undercut bevel, and save the trimmed edges. 


Sprinkle something on your form to prevent the clay from sticking. I use corn starch. 

Place the trimmed slab bevel side down on your form and paddle it THOROUGHLY, from center to edge, then once more evenly all over.  You can use whatever you want as a paddle, here I used a sandbag, but I usually use a wooden paddle. 


Place the trimmed edges you saved back on the paddled slab, followed by a paper towel or other cloth, and your board. Turn over the form to release the slab onto the board. 


Press the center of the slab down gently and let the edge pieces support the edge of the plate. While supporting the edge with one hand, use the other to define a concavity in the bevel with a convex tool. Anything convex and with a curve you like will work. I used a little ball here. Sometimes I use a rib, sometimes a roller, sometimes a clamshell. I like rollers and balls because they compress the edge well. 


Finish and further compress the edge with a damp (not wet) chamois or sponge. Done!

2016-03-20 Glaze tests 釉薬の実験

Fired with cones 6,7,8 on top and bottom shelves. Pyrometer at middle shelf, didn’t display over 1215C.
Hotter on bottom than top. By cone, looks like cone 9+ on the bottom, cone 9 at the middle, and cone 8+ at the top.

Reduction strong at top shelf, weaker at middle and bottom.

棚三段、上、中、下。 オートンコーン6,7,8 使用、上:下置。温度計は中に。焼成中の温度計は1215Cを超えずが、上は8番コーンは曲がって、ヘタレ。下は8番フラット。 実際の温度は下:9+、ちゅう:9、上:8+ とみていいでしょう。
上は還元効いているようだが、中:下は中性気味。

Unloading:

Bottom shelf, front. Mid shelf, rear left. Top shelf, rear right.
Bottom shelf, front. Mid shelf, rear left. Top shelf, rear right.
Top shelf
Top shelf
Mid shelf
Mid shelf
Bottom shelf
Bottom shelf
Bottom cones
Bottom cones
Top cones
Top cones

 

Clay : Ash Blends  (Lft, to Rt.:  Bott.,Mid.,Top)

Taku shiro 90 : Dobai 10
Taku shiro 90 : Dobai 10
Taku shiro 80 : Dobai 20
Taku shiro 80 : Dobai 20
Taku shiro 70 : Dobai 30
Taku shiro 70 : Dobai 30
Taku shiro 60 : Dobai 40
Taku shiro 60 : Dobai 40

 

Stone : Ash Blends    (Lft, to Rt.:  Bott.,Mid.,Top)

Sandstone 90 : Dobai 10
Sandstone 90 : Dobai 10
Sandstone 80 : Dobai 20
Sandstone 80 : Dobai 20
Sandstone 70 : Dobai 30
Sandstone 70 : Dobai 30
Sandstone 60 : Dobai 40
Sandstone 60 : Dobai 40

 

Clay : Ash total, plus 280g Shirakawa

Clay:Ash total +280g toseki
Clay:Ash total +280g toseki

 

Stone : Ash total, plus 280g Shirakawa

Stone:Ash total + 280g toseki
Stone:Ash total + 280g toseki

 

Everything dumped together: Stone:Clay:Ash:Shirakawa

Clay:Stone:Ash:Toseki total
Clay:Stone:Ash:Toseki total

 

Stone:Ash 70:30 from top shelf (cone 8+) in the sunlight:

Stone:Ash 70:30 @ cone 8 1/2
Stone:Ash 70:30 @ cone 8 1/2

IMG_3681

Gas Firing 2016.02.20 Comments and Notes

This firing of the kiln went too long, resulting in Orton cone 11 flat.  Ideally, it would be cone 11 touching, then sagging a bit.

Upon unloading the kiln this morning, one thing was immediately apparent: the right side was far more reduced than the left. Yellower glazes and more slumping. Even on the left side there was some slumping, because of the excessive temp., and because of the clay which contained some low temp high iron clay to help seal the ware against leakage.

Left side, sagging only slightly, white surface.
Left side, sagging only slightly, white surface.
Right side sagging badly, white glaze turned yellow.
Right side sagging badly, white glaze turned yellow.

Chosen Karatsu came out pretty good, but the white was on too heavy, running down the pots too much.  It still came out looking ok because of the clay.

Most of the teabowls warped or sagged, so I only get to keep 2 or 3 of the 15. This is why teabowls are expensive, kids…IMG_3399 IMG_3398

All in all, not a bad firing, but need to adjust clay bodies, and pay closer attention to cones. Also, figure out the over reduction on the right side. It might be that one burner that sounds a bit off.

Kakewake CG bowls
Kakewake CG bowls
guinomi, need more sand in the clay
guinomi, need more sand in the clay
crystals, only grew on the right side, where reduction was strongest.
crystals, only grew on the right side, where reduction was strongest.
cylindrical tea bowls
cylindrical tea bowls
yunomi
yunomi
shells on feet
shells on feet

IMG_3437

saggared and much improved.
saggared and much improved.
porcelain, saggared
porcelain, saggared

IMG_3464 IMG_3463 IMG_3462 IMG_3460 IMG_3459

 

Fall 2015

has been busy.

I’ve gotten pretty far behind keeping up with the blog, falling into the bad habit of making small posts to Facebook. One of my areas of increased effort over the next year will be to work more on maintaining the blog, and getting it more integrated with other forms of social media. Trying to keep track of them all is like trying to herd cats.
I had made one promise to show before/after pictures for a couple of pieces, the first of which is the slab/paddle built sake chiller w/ feet and lugs:

IMG_2176
raw unglazed
IMG_2513
Fired piece, Chosen Karatsu style glaze. Matchbook for scale.
IMG_2518
Underside detail. Fired on shells, feet not touching the shelf.
IMG_2516
Glaze detail

 

The other thing I’ve been working on since early this year is getting a usable kohiki/clear glaze combination, because for some reason a lot of customers have been requesting white work. They have also been requesting black, so I’ve been working on getting a reliable semi matte black glaze. Mission not quite accomplished, but I feel I’m most of the way there. Here is the kohiki I’ve come up with and I am happy with it:

Kohiki cups. Cup on the left is unused. Middle has been used a bit, and right has been used a lot. The patina is beautiful in my opinion, and the fineness of the crackle is something I’ve been wanting for a long time in my work.
Various guinomi from 2015, mostly from the fall firing. Guinomi make great gyokuro drinking cups.
Various guinomi from 2015, mostly from the fall firing. Guinomi make great gyokuro drinking cups.
Seabirds on white.
Seabirds on white.
The other thing I have started doing is Japanese kana inspired brushwork
The other thing I have started doing is Japanese kana inspired brushwork, except with English. This cup is decorated with vertical English writing, a Goethe quote I like: “Whatever you can do, or think you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it.” One of the other said: “Don’t be a dick.” These were more popular than I had anticipated and are currently sold out. Definitely making more!

Here are some of the pieces with the new black glaze. It seems to look best thin, and as with most glazes looks nicer over interesting wild clays rather than processed clays.

Type 1 semi matte black Katakuchi with black lacquer repairs.
Type 1 semi matte black Katakuchi with black lacquer repairs.
Type 1 semi matte black dish.
Type 1 semi matte black dish.
Semi mmatte type 2: two black glazes layered
matte type 2: two black glazes layered, makes a fatter glaze surface.