Tag Archives: kiln

Scoring Goodies

I made a trip out to the mountains in Minamihata yesterday with my mentor to collect materials for pots and glazes, and we stopped by an old kiln site as well.

We were able to collect a good amount of feldspathic sandstone, weathered feldspar, and the ever popular grey stuff (don’t know what its real name is).

First, here is what we collected that will become pots and glazes this year:

The lot of it
Grey stuff. This is softer than rock and can be stamp milled or pot milled easily into a fine slurry. It has a lot of iron, and I use it as a glaze ingredient, as a slip, or as a pigment for decoration.
Sandstone. This has more iron than I’d normally like, but beggars can’t be choosers. It takes the place of both feldspar additions to clay bodies as well as grog. I like it because it helps the body vitrify, but gives it texture as well.
More sandstone.
Glaze stone from near Okawachiyama. I’m not sure but I believe this is the glaze stone used in Nabeshima celadon. I look forward to testing this.
Closeup. You can see the feldspathic translucent pieces in the matrix, surrounded by the white powdery matrix. I think the white powdery part is high in silica, but again, need to test.
Found this in the same place as the Nabeshima glaze stone. This looks to be more pure feldspar. Very curious to see how it fires!

On the way to one of the collecting sites, we passed two old Karatsu kilns, Fujinokawachi and Kayanotani.  I was surprised because they are separated by no more than 70 meters or so. These were big kilns. Kayanotani was a 22 chamber climbing kiln 52 meters long! Between them, there were probably hundreds of potters working. We couldn’t really access Fujinokawachi, but we were able to walk around on the hill where Kayanotani once stood.

Access to Kayanotani. You can see the faint grassy steps up the hill, just to the left and down a bit from the tree.
Sign board standing at the entrance to the kiln site. The shard pile extends up and down the hill to the left of the sign.
The outside surfaces of some coil and paddle flasks. Fujinokawachi and Kayanotani are both known for their fine coil and paddle work.
Interiors of the same. Note the different clays used and the different patterns created from the paddling tools.
Hillside littered with shards and chunks of kiln wall and kiln furniture.
The feet of some ash glazed bowls. The clay is quite light in color, and really vitrified.
Detail of some flask lips. On the one, you can see some bubbling in the glaze because the clay body started to bloat. The coil and paddle clay bodies were quite varied, but much of it seemed to contain high amounts of organic matter
More bowls. One in a light clay body, the other much darker. Again, vitrified and hard. All of the trimmed pieces I found were trimmed with an economy of movement. There is no wasted time in the trimming here.
Detail of another foot. Gorgeous clay, and lively trimming.
Interior detail of bowl directly above. Note the beautifully folded over and compress lip of the piece stuck to the inside here, and the glaze window.
Paddled Chosen Karatsu flask. I wish I could get those blues!
Detail of flask neck.
Detail, lip.

Fall Open Studio

Just a short post of some pictures from the studio sale this weekend.

Chosen Karatsu Slabs

I had to make a batch of slab plates after the fall wood kiln firing, because every one of my slabs cracked in that firing. Turns out the clay I used was high in silica, and didn’t agree with the long wood kiln firing. The silica turned into cristabolite, and all pots made with that clay experienced shivering, or cracking, no matter what glaze they were paired with, and across a range of temperatures.

Forward a few weeks, and I’m frantically trying to get some replacement plates fired because this weekend is the fall open studio event, followed by an exhibition in Nagasaki during the first week of Dec.

For the most part this firing went well, aside from the fact that I exploded my large platter. Drat.

Fall 2014 Wood Firing Continued

The unloaded pots have now been hammered, moved inside the studio, or are getting refired. The ones that have been moved inside the studio are starting to get cleaned up and polished, in preparation for next spring’s shows.

All in all, there were some 750+- pots in this load. I’m not sure of an exact number because I started smashing before I had a count.

Here are some of the pots that I started cleaning up today. Most of them are small  dishes, ranging from 10 – 17cm across.  All sizes listed are width, and are approximate measurements.

I have this recurring nightmare…

before every firing of the wood kiln. Actually it is four separate recurring nightmares. In the first, I am loading pots onto normal wood shelves in a fairly standard living room, for some reason not worrying that the lot of it will burn up with the entire house. BUT, for some reason, I always remove all of the lamps and light fixtures, because they and they alone can’t handle the  high temps.

In the second, we are firing the kiln as usual, and we are into the third day, just hours before finishing and I realize that I FORGOT TO LOAD THE KILN… This one is by far the worst of the dreams. The feeling of sudden panic is positively sublime. Very happy to wake up (and realize it was just a dream) after this one…

The next is not quite as bad as the previous, but still pretty unsettling.  It starts out well enough: I have just unloaded a very successful firing and am so happy with it that I decide to fire again. Because it is a dream, I miraculously have enough glazed ware to load the kiln up again in about 2 days (Normally takes me 10). I get everything loaded, and start the fire, but about a day into the firing I realize I ONLY HAVE ONE DAY WORTH OF FIREWOOD! This one also wakes me up with that icky panicky feeling.

The third is not a nightmare per se, but a recurring dream about a kiln that doesn’t exist. It is a large single chamber, with white interior, and there are shelves on the walls and in the center of the large chamber on a sort of island. The floor, walls, and island are all white and rough with kiln wash. There is no chimney, and the kiln is connected to the fire box via an elevated brick tunnel, which goes out the rear of the chamber about 2 meters, turns 90 degrees right, stretches about 8 meters, then takes another 90 degree right turn, where extends forward and turns into the firebox. From the firebox to the kiln forms a large U shape. Even more strange, the firebox is open to the sky and steps up to the flue channel, which somehow ‘sucks’ in the heat of the fire. The firebox is probably 4 meters long/deep, and the wood used is huge: entire tree trunks shoved in and stacked in a criss cross pattern, burning.  Any one have a kiln that looks like this?

Coming up to this fall firing in Oct., I feel as though everything is under control, and no particularly strong feelings of anxiety, yet the dreams continue, including 2 nights in a row now, a dream of some of my teeth falling out. Seems quite normal in the dream at least…

TV Crew Visit Studio

Today I had a very nice visit from a television station who did a very nice job of filming the studio, as well as conducting an interview with me for a show segment coming up in August. They filmed the studio and kiln, me making a coil and paddle jar, me glazing a bisqued piece of  similar form, and also finished pieces which had the same glaze as the demo forms.

All in all, a very thorough job on their part, although I have no idea how they will edit everything down to fit in a 5 minute segment.

I had taken photos of the crew to put up on the blog, but apparently the station prefers not to have behind the scenes images of its projects made public, so I am leaving them out for now.

I will, however, include a few images similar to what may show up on the air in a few weeks. Also, once the show airs and the segment is viewable on the internet, I will post a link to it for all this blog’s viewers.