Tag Archives: kick wheel

Let them eat cake

Here is my latest pot porn for you: freshly stamp milled, slaked, and filter pressed cakes of Izumiyama porcelain. 150kg. 


Not for the faint of heart, Izumiyama is hard to work with. It is non plastic and likes to crack during drying, impossible for slab work, and deforms easily. And it costs more than twice as much as Amakusa porcelain from Kumamoto. Most porcelain artists in Arita and Imari switched to using Amakusa porcelain long ago because it’s much easier to work with, doesn’t crack, and fires whiter. 


BUT! The beauty of Izumiyama in the wood kiln is absolutely undeniable. It fires to a soft ivory white and blushes in very subtle shades of peach. The surface is deep and translucent and vitrifies as low as around 1230C. 

Tomorrow morning first thing, Peter the Pugger will be getting a major workout!

2015 Christmas Firing

was a real nail biter.  At 4am, 10 hours into the firing, I realized that I had not gauged my propane reserves properly, when I looked at the tanks and realized that they were only about 1/5 full and covered with a thick layer of ice. I immediately put the water hose on them to melt the ice and keep them from freezing again, then I chewed my nails until 8:30 am when I could finally call the gas company for fresh tanks. They arrived just after 9am, and good thing to because I only had about 2 inches of fuel left in the tanks at that point.

The firing ran a total of about 18 hours, which is fairly normal for this type of firing, and most things came out ok, with a few exceptions:

Fall Open Studio

Just a short post of some pictures from the studio sale this weekend.

Coil and paddle

I have been working on coil and paddle pots these last few days. This is a sequence of photos from a jar I made today. It’s not very big, probably about 36 cm across.


  
  
  
  
  

My favorite studio tool…

….is without a doubt the Peter Pugger de-airing pugger/mixer. Until two years ago I did all of my clay and stone mixing in a large deep platter by hand, and it was killing my wrists.  Hearing all the wonderful things Peter Pugger had to say on their website, I took the plunge and decided to spend the money and save my hands. I figured if the thing worked half as well as it was supposed to, I would be ok.

Well, it is now about 2 years since I got it and it does everything it is reputed to do, and does it very well. My wrists are now pain free, and I have saved hundreds of hours of time processing and blending clay bodies.

Blending wet clay bodies usually takes about 15 minutes of mixing, but mostly I mix dry materials with water (sometimes blending into wet bodies), and this takes a while longer, usually around 30 minutes.

In my work, keeping the character of the wild clay is of utmost importance, and I’ve found that de-airing generally kills that character dead. However, the de-airing is necessary in getting the water to penetrate the dry materials more quickly, so that I don’t have to let the pugged clay sit for a month before using.

My solution to this is to let the clay mix, then I de-air it once completely, followed by re-mixing the batch for 5 – 10 minutes after reintroducing air. This gives me clay that is not as easy to throw, but which gives very nice trimmed texture.

Here are some pictures of some clay from the other day which I collected from the mountain behind my home. I added the dry/damp clumps of clay to the hopper (removing as many large rocks as I could find), then water, then mixed. I repeated these three steps until the hopper was full, then mixed for about 20 minutes, turned on the vacuum pump, and de-aired completely.

Next I went to lunch.  It was yummy. It was sunny on the deck and there was a cool breeze. The neighbors have a  great cherry tree in full bloom and the wind was blowing the petals off, and they were fluttering across the yard like giant pink snowflakes. I noticed as I saw some of them fall across the deck that the wisteria was budding out and even starting to show some purple. Nice. I imagine the wisteria will be in full bloom a few weeks early this year.

After coming back to the studio, I re-introduced air to the mixing chamber and mixed some more, then pugged it all out and made some pots. The whole process took about 2 hours. It takes even less time if you decide not to include lunch, but I recommend including it.

Red Lungs

Getting ready to set up a whole kiln load of glaze tests to fix my misbehaving ame (iron/ash) glaze, and realize that I’m out one very important ingredient, red ochre collected from a place right here in Taku. Completely forgot that I had used the last of it in my last glaze batch mixed up a couple months ago. Doh!

So…. Delay the mixing of test glazes for tiles and cups, I had to spend the day crushing and sieving red ochre. I haven’t used my man powered stamp mill in a while, and I added too much material to the mortar. My wooden pestle (4 foot long pole) that I use to stamp the material was just not up to the task because it was too light to sink down into the material and get it circulating in the mortar.  To remedy this, I retrofitted one of my wooden pestles with some  3cm diameter round steel bar left over from a long piece of bar I cut into sections for my kiln’s grate bars.

This new pestle worked really great, so great in fact, that material was flying out of the mortar from the striking force. So I proceeded to cut down a large cardboard box to keep most of that stuff from flying out or away. It is really hard work digging it, carting it around, and crushing it, I hate to lose any at all.

So anyway, here are some pictures of today’s festivities, and I did wear a dust mask, so I don’t have to worry about getting red lungs…

Mortar full of material, big chunks.
Mortar full of material, big chunks.

WD_1020

My two 'pestles'
My two ‘pestles’
retrofitting with steel bars
retrofitting with steel bars
Now we're in business!
Now we’re in business!
Things moving along nicely now.
Things moving along nicely now.
Sieving. This is one of the jobs I dislike the most.
Sieving. This is one of the jobs I dislike the most.
This bucketful is sieved through 50 mesh. Before using it, I will re-sieve through 80 mesh, most likely.
This bucketful is sieved through 50 mesh. Before using it, I will re-sieve through 80 mesh, most likely.