Tag Archives: japanese

May/June Update

Well, all lot of little things have happened over the last month or so, but nothing really blogworthy all by itself, so I thought I might do an umbrella post for May/June.

First, and what I posted about before, was the Workshop in Taku, 2012: The Simple Teabowl workshop, with Kawakami Mako, Tsuruta Yoshihisa, Okamoto Sakurei, and Maruta Munehiko. We started with a wonderful tea ceremony demonstration and talk, then we moved outside to prepare tea ourselves. The second and third day, Tsuruta sensei demonstrated his pottery making techniques, fourth and fifth day Okamoto sensei demonstrated, and on the sixth day we watched Maruta sensei at his studio. The last evening we had a very nice banquet at Hisago, and Kawakami sensei joined us again for that.

After the workshop I needed to decompress for a couple of days, then found out I’d be needing to go back to the US for the summer, so I moved up my kiln firing schedule to the end of June. Got into the studio to start making work again, and also found some time to bid on a Furo being auctioned off on Yahoo Auctions. A Furo is used to heat water for tea ceremony. Next, after years of looking for a suitable garden hose storage device, I broke down and decided to just make a few which I am pretty happy with, we’ll see how they look after the firing. Several friends came over last weekend and spent much of the day playing on my wheels. They ended up with about 20 pots which will go into the next firing. I wedged up some clay and played too, some guinomi and chawan for the rear chamber. Lastly, I spent yesterday morning gathering wood from the local mill, who sold me three K truck (a very light little flatbed type of truck that is used a lot in the country areas of Japan) loads of mill ends for about $30, a real bargain, so I donated some coffee mugs to their mill office. Hopefully they will get some use out of them.

Well, that’s about it, have a great week!

 

Mike

WIT2012,The First Pottery Demo: Tsuruta Yoshihisa

Here are some pictures from the first pottery demo conducted during the Workshop in Taku, 2012: The Simple Teabowl. Tsuruta Sensei’s demonstration was conducted over the course of two mornings. He did all of his work on a small kickwheel, focusing on handbuilding techniques for teabowls, cups, flasks, and water jars.

The first day he demonstrated coil built bowls, cups, and a flask. The second day he trimmed the first day’s pieces, and demonstrated the coil and paddle water jar.

Thank you Kim and Minna for all of your great photos!

New Pots, Finally!

Unloaded the kiln yesterday and started cleaning up some of the keepers. This firing was good. A lot of keepers, some refires, and a few hammers.
Here are a few of the pots that are at least partially cleaned up and ready to go.

Katakuchi and Guinomi

Here are some of the last pots to be made for the upcoming firing. Katakuchi (spouted bowls) and guinomi (small drinking cups).

The katakuchi are made from 3 blended clays, with added sand and crushed porcelain stone. I got lucky with the clay for the guinomi, clay gathered from a roadside cut more than 10 years ago by an in-law. It was really nice to throw with, and trimmed like a dream. This was the last of it, so I’m really hoping to get some keepers.

The spouts are really simple. Just a lump of clay smashed out with your thumb against the palm of your hand, then attached to the pot. If you look closely you can see the creases of my hand in the undersides of the spouts.

I realized that I tend to post pictures of unfinished work more often than not. I’ll try to remember to post pictures of the finished pots after the firing, if they come through it ok.

Okamoto Sakurei Show Pictures

Karatsu potter Okamoto Sakurei just ended a show in Fukuoka this weekend at Gallery Ichibankan. For those of you who haven’t heard of him, Okamoto san is a very talented artist making Karatsu style wares. He is well known throughout the country and one of the top Karatsu ceramic artists today. He will also be doing a demonstration/lecture for the  Workshop in Taku 2012: The Simple Teabowl.

During my visit we had a chance to discuss his upcoming presentation, as well as some wood firing diagnostics. Here are some of the pictures from the show. The gallery used a lot of natural light from its windows, which made for a very nice display, however it was not so camera friendly.

Made a dent in the wood pile today…

Spend a good bit of time sorting and splitting wood for the next couple of firings today. Before the kiln was built, Craig Edwards mentioned on a couple of occasions that having the wood split and sorted makes for a much easier time firing. I understood the need for splitting, but sorting kind of stumped me. I couldn’t understand why sorting for length would help, thinking that one could estimate the volume of wood going in each stoke, more shorter pieces or less longer pieces, right?

This seems to work in theory, but when you start adding in factors like stoking under the grates vs over the grates, or doing the wooden door technique, or side stoking through a smaller hole that tilts down, then the size and length of the faggots gets pretty important pretty fast. Having to sort through a stack for  the right size during the firing makes for a stressful time. Having the right size stacked in the right place so that it doesn’t need  to be moved a lot really cuts down on the labor.

So, this time I culled out all of the longest wood and split it first, stacking it near the front of the kiln. Shorter fat pieces near the front as well, with thinner pieces toward the middle and rear for side stoking the front and rear chambers. Also a special section of extra long pieces for doing a wooden door type stoke to get over stalls, if they happen. Here are some pictures of the stacks, plus a little potter porn.