Tag Archives: ceramics

A Week of Good Pots

I’ve just come off of a week of pot showing and selling, sharing space with some very fine young (and older) potters who are making crazy good work. This last week was Karatsu Yakimon Matsuri, which ran concurrently with Arita Touki-Ichi. This was the third year for the Karatsu event, and attendance jumped to 100,000, from 70,000 last year.

The theme was tableware, and there were many collaborative exhibits between potters and chefs. What a great time it was to see all of the wonderful work. Gave me a LOT of new ideas and inspiration, as well as some great feedback from customers and restaurant owners.

I had been scheduled to go to the Mungyeong Teabowl Festival, however the ferry accident resulted in most or all of the spring holiday’s festivals being cancelled or postponed.

 

Chosen Karatsu vase with wisteria.
Chosen Karatsu vase with wisteria.
Chosen Karatsu bucket. (Oke, 桶)
Chosen Karatsu bucket. (Oke, 桶)
Kuro Karatsu and Muji Karatsu guinomi. The kuro sold on the last day.
Kuro Karatsu and Muji Karatsu guinomi. The kuro sold on the last day.
Chosen Karatsu bucket. (Oke, 桶)
Chosen Karatsu bucket. (Oke, 桶)
Ao Karatsu Tower
Ao Karatsu Tower
Chosen Karatsu Teabowl
Chosen Karatsu Teabowl
Paddled Jar with gold repair
Paddled Jar with gold repair
Ao Karatsu platter, 50cm
Ao Karatsu platter, 50cm

Aging pots

Lately I’ve been experimenting with ways to age pots more quickly, making the crackle stand out. This time I tried an old woodworking trick, and it seems to work nicely.

I soaked the pots in a strong tea bath then dried completely.  After that, I applied iron acetate with a brush and let them sit a couple of days. The iron acetate reacts with tannins and turns a dark color within about 3 days. I made the iron acetate by soaking steel wool in vinegar. I may change to a weak sulfuric acid solution, since the smell of the vinegar is proving difficult to get out of the pots!

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New Videos

I finally sat down and figured out how to use my video camera and software. For anyone who is interested, here are some videos I posted to youtube.

Karatsu Sake Cups

Sake Cup Trimming Part 1

Sake Cup Trimming Part 2

Karatsu Teabowls

Karatsu Teabowl Trimming

All of these pots were made with clay from the property, discovered right under where we built the kiln. It has a lot of iron, but still takes some heat, and won’t bloat at higher temps. Probably due in part to the fact that it is very open with a lot of sand and other even larger inclusions. Even vitrified, it still sweats because of the openness. With use, the sweating stops, as all the pores fill with minerals from the water and tea tannins, etc…

8th Wood Firing Photo Record

This post is a photo record with comments, in order to organize and retain my thoughts and observations about the 8th firing of the wood kiln. I always think I’ll remember until the next firing, but never do. So, if you get into this, beware there are a LOT of pictures, some of which may seem redundant. There are examples of most of the pots from the firing, minus teabowls and some others which are not photographed yet.

The 8th firing was a charm overall, with many good pots, some bad, and some that will get refired. Kiln was fired in oxidation primarily. We stoked once every 30 minutes for 2 1/2 days, then once every 20 minutes the last half day.

– Front was nicely melted, nice even gradient to the rear of first chamber, E-Karatsu was about ideal. Cone 12 at hottest front down to cone 6 at coolest rear.

– Front chamber behaves like anagama. No significant temp gradient from front to back of each setting. Next firing, will pack kiln by eliminating the space between settings, leaving horizontal space for flame travel. One long setting from front to back of first chamber.

– Ame yu better at low temps. Load rear to mid chamber.

– Ao yu needs more heat, mid to front chamber.

– Large platters go midway to back of front chamber. Too much ash up front.

– Firebox wares are very nice in a three day firing. Great place for Shino, under cover to avoid ash in pots.

– Rear chamber fires fast when preheated for 3 days. Jumped from 1044C to 1344C in four stokes, a little over an hour. Care must be taken to spend more time soaking at high temp, because rear chamber high temp wares not quite mature (surface changes only), clay not melted well. Spend 3 or 4 hours firing off rear chamber, slowly, to get inside the pots.

– Rear chamber fires very evenly front to back, and top to bottom. Pick a temp to fire at and load accordingly. Don’t expect a significant gradient.

 

New Paddled Water Jars and Flower Vases

Here are the first of a bunch of water jars and flower vases that are going into the kiln this early fall. I really needed some practice coiling, paddling, and collaring in necks on the kickwheel and 船徳利 funadokkuri (boat flasks) are the perfect shape for it. Traditionally these were used as flasks for oil, etc. on boats. They needed to be hard to tip over, hence the wide flat bottom. Now they are mostly used for flower arrangements.

All of the water jars will have wooden lids made for them. I’ve done one or two in the past with surprising positive response from viewers/customers. The lids are fun to make, since they are a non traditional item, you can play around a bit with them. I’ll post some lids later on, if the pots make it through the firing.

3 boat flasks and one taller crane necked flask
3 boat flasks and one taller crane necked flask
water jars. any marks in the clay need to be pretty over the top, because the glaze covers them over for the most part.
water jars. any marks in the clay need to be pretty over the top, because the glaze covers them over for the most part.
lug and lip detail
lug and lip detail
more jars, a couple with 'nail heads' added, instead of lugs. You sometimes see these on tea cups and food dishes in Karatsu ware.
more jars, a couple with ‘nail heads’ added, instead of lugs. You sometimes see these on tea cups and food dishes in Karatsu ware.

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all together now... The tallest flask is about 28cm tall,dry.
all together now… The tallest flask is about 28cm tall,dry.
Karatsu meets pueblo water jar, with kneeling, bowing tea person receiving tea. This started as a lug and sort of went bananas from there. This could be one of those things where I later slap myself.
Karatsu meets pueblo water jar, with kneeling, bowing tea person receiving tea. This started as a lug and sort of went bananas from there. This could be one of those things where I later slap myself.
Tall necked vase with two pairs of tea people bowing.
Tall necked vase with two pairs of tea people bowing.
Karatsu meets pueblo water jar. sorry for the order here...
Karatsu meets pueblo water jar. sorry for the order here…
Lug detail. I really must have wanted to drink tea that day.
Lug detail. I really must have wanted to drink tea that day.
boat flask with porcelain additions. Here's the big question: Will they pop off upon drying?
boat flask with porcelain additions. Here’s the big question: Will they pop off upon drying?
tall necked flower vase with lugs, (finally some normal ones)
tall necked flower vase with lugs, (finally some normal ones)