Tag Archives: 唐津焼

Making Furniture

Nope, not that kind…

These last 2 weeks I have been getting over my fear and loathing of slabs, because I have finally figured out how to keep them from cracking during drying. So, lots of slab plates for starters, then a customer came in who wanted even more in different sizes for his sushi restaurant. This is good high end restaurant, and there is a very high chance of repeat business.

Anyway, I had been using someone else’s risers for my plates, but since I needed my own anyway, I spent a few hours today mixing up some fireclay and press molded my own risers.  Below are pictures of the very simple process. These risers will be used during drying and also during firing to support corners and edges. The fire clay is very rough and easy to grind off if the glaze runs and sticks to it.

Riser jig. I just press in a clay coil then trim lengthwise with a wire.
Riser jig. I just press in a clay coil then trim lengthwise with a wire.
Risers sitting on plaster to stiffen.
Risers sitting on plaster to stiffen.
Risers before cutting
Risers before cutting
After cutting, about 360 risers.
After cutting, about 360 risers.

Here are some of the plates that have been made so far:

 

Slabs cut and laid to rest/stiffen for a night.
Slabs cut and laid to rest/stiffen for a night.
Stiffened slabs cut to match template.
Stiffened slabs cut to match template.
Finished and supported with risers.
Finished and supported with risers.
Natural stone texture.
Natural stone texture.
Four sided slab plates, 22cm x 15cm.
Four sided slab plates, 22cm x 15cm.
Square slab plates, 25cm square
Square slab plates, 25cm square
Thrown/stretched slab 'Abalone' plates
Thrown/stretched slab ‘Abalone’ plates
More slab plates, this time much more flat, so that picking up sushi is easy.
More slab plates, this time much more flat, so that picking up sushi is easy.

Processing Clay and Ash

In a recent massive cleaning around and in the studio, I changed things around to utilize some of the outside space more efficiently. One of the most important things is that I now, again, have a setup for processing clay and ash that I have collected and burned.

I had been getting close to finishing off my stores of collected clay that I processed some years back, time to start doing it again. I think I have a better system this time, and I have an inexhaustible supply of pine ash for now, too.

I have buckets, bags, and jars full of old collected clay and dry trimmings that need recycling. It should take some months to get it all blunged and pugged.

Collected clay that has literally been sitting around for years.
Collected clay that has literally been sitting around for years.

The Choppage ‘cho’ ‘pah’ gay’, is a traditional Korean tool for scooping off clay and other materials without disturbing everything underneath. It works much better than a ladle. I couldn’t find anyone who made them anymore, but my mentor still had one which is kindly letting me borrow.

Clay washing bucket setup, and scooping tool, called choppage.
Clay washing bucket setup, and scooping tool, called choppage.

I just agitate the material in the bottom bucket, wait, and scoop off the stuff that settles last.
Then, later after it settles in the upper bucket, I siphon the water back down into the main bucket. When enough of the upper bucket fills with material, I dump it into cloth lined basket or plaster to get out the excess water.

After returning water back into the main bucket from the 'good stuff' bucket.
After returning water back into the main bucket from the ‘good stuff’ bucket.

With the ash, the process is the same, but after I get out the good fine ash I transfer it into another bucket and wash it some more to get out the nasties. The nasties cause problems with glazing sometimes and I don’t like them. I do save the water containing the nasties for other uses.

Pine ash bucket setup, main on bottom, fine up top.
Pine ash bucket setup, main on bottom, fine up top.

The leftover rough ash stuff seems like a waste to just throw away, so I am thinking about ball milling it to see if it can be useful in some other way. We’ll see…

The leftovers after the good stuff is scooped off.
The leftovers after the good stuff is scooped off.

 

Scooping with the choppage tool.
Scooping with the choppage tool.

The sieve is 120 mesh, because I lucked into a cheap recycled sieve. I would usually use 100 mesh, so it is not much of a difference.

Dumping through sieve which is sitting on the bucket mouth.
Dumping through sieve which is sitting on the bucket mouth.

A Week of Good Pots

I’ve just come off of a week of pot showing and selling, sharing space with some very fine young (and older) potters who are making crazy good work. This last week was Karatsu Yakimon Matsuri, which ran concurrently with Arita Touki-Ichi. This was the third year for the Karatsu event, and attendance jumped to 100,000, from 70,000 last year.

The theme was tableware, and there were many collaborative exhibits between potters and chefs. What a great time it was to see all of the wonderful work. Gave me a LOT of new ideas and inspiration, as well as some great feedback from customers and restaurant owners.

I had been scheduled to go to the Mungyeong Teabowl Festival, however the ferry accident resulted in most or all of the spring holiday’s festivals being cancelled or postponed.

 

Chosen Karatsu vase with wisteria.
Chosen Karatsu vase with wisteria.
Chosen Karatsu bucket. (Oke, 桶)
Chosen Karatsu bucket. (Oke, 桶)
Kuro Karatsu and Muji Karatsu guinomi. The kuro sold on the last day.
Kuro Karatsu and Muji Karatsu guinomi. The kuro sold on the last day.
Chosen Karatsu bucket. (Oke, 桶)
Chosen Karatsu bucket. (Oke, 桶)
Ao Karatsu Tower
Ao Karatsu Tower
Chosen Karatsu Teabowl
Chosen Karatsu Teabowl
Paddled Jar with gold repair
Paddled Jar with gold repair
Ao Karatsu platter, 50cm
Ao Karatsu platter, 50cm

Views of a repaired teabowl

This is the teabowl that fell into the firebox during the last firing and broke into about 12 pieces. After falling and breaking, the firing continued, and the larger shards warped a bit, making it hard to get the pieces to fit just right.

Everything went back together, but some of the spaces were 1mm wide or more, and a lot of filling was required. Not only that, but the edges of the larger pieces didn’t meet evenly, making a lot of uneven fill lines. I thought about grinding down the higher edges, but in the end decided against that, because the fill lines were already so wide in some places.

So, here is the finished piece, with the lacquer and gold brushed on over the fill lines. A pro could have made thinner, more even lines probably, but it was good practice for me. A few more days to dry completely, then it will be time to whip up some tea…

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Aging pots

Lately I’ve been experimenting with ways to age pots more quickly, making the crackle stand out. This time I tried an old woodworking trick, and it seems to work nicely.

I soaked the pots in a strong tea bath then dried completely.  After that, I applied iron acetate with a brush and let them sit a couple of days. The iron acetate reacts with tannins and turns a dark color within about 3 days. I made the iron acetate by soaking steel wool in vinegar. I may change to a weak sulfuric acid solution, since the smell of the vinegar is proving difficult to get out of the pots!

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