Category Archives: tools

Coil and paddle

I have been working on coil and paddle pots these last few days. This is a sequence of photos from a jar I made today. It’s not very big, probably about 36 cm across.


  
  
  
  
  

My favorite studio tool…

….is without a doubt the Peter Pugger de-airing pugger/mixer. Until two years ago I did all of my clay and stone mixing in a large deep platter by hand, and it was killing my wrists.  Hearing all the wonderful things Peter Pugger had to say on their website, I took the plunge and decided to spend the money and save my hands. I figured if the thing worked half as well as it was supposed to, I would be ok.

Well, it is now about 2 years since I got it and it does everything it is reputed to do, and does it very well. My wrists are now pain free, and I have saved hundreds of hours of time processing and blending clay bodies.

Blending wet clay bodies usually takes about 15 minutes of mixing, but mostly I mix dry materials with water (sometimes blending into wet bodies), and this takes a while longer, usually around 30 minutes.

In my work, keeping the character of the wild clay is of utmost importance, and I’ve found that de-airing generally kills that character dead. However, the de-airing is necessary in getting the water to penetrate the dry materials more quickly, so that I don’t have to let the pugged clay sit for a month before using.

My solution to this is to let the clay mix, then I de-air it once completely, followed by re-mixing the batch for 5 – 10 minutes after reintroducing air. This gives me clay that is not as easy to throw, but which gives very nice trimmed texture.

Here are some pictures of some clay from the other day which I collected from the mountain behind my home. I added the dry/damp clumps of clay to the hopper (removing as many large rocks as I could find), then water, then mixed. I repeated these three steps until the hopper was full, then mixed for about 20 minutes, turned on the vacuum pump, and de-aired completely.

Next I went to lunch.  It was yummy. It was sunny on the deck and there was a cool breeze. The neighbors have a  great cherry tree in full bloom and the wind was blowing the petals off, and they were fluttering across the yard like giant pink snowflakes. I noticed as I saw some of them fall across the deck that the wisteria was budding out and even starting to show some purple. Nice. I imagine the wisteria will be in full bloom a few weeks early this year.

After coming back to the studio, I re-introduced air to the mixing chamber and mixed some more, then pugged it all out and made some pots. The whole process took about 2 hours. It takes even less time if you decide not to include lunch, but I recommend including it.

Pieces and notes fall firing 2014

Fall 2014 Wood Firing Continued

The unloaded pots have now been hammered, moved inside the studio, or are getting refired. The ones that have been moved inside the studio are starting to get cleaned up and polished, in preparation for next spring’s shows.

All in all, there were some 750+- pots in this load. I’m not sure of an exact number because I started smashing before I had a count.

Here are some of the pots that I started cleaning up today. Most of them are small  dishes, ranging from 10 – 17cm across.  All sizes listed are width, and are approximate measurements.

2014 Fall Firing: Unloading the Kiln

Here are images from Saturday’s unloading of the kiln.  Some good, some bad, but mostly good.

Most problems came from mistakes made with clay or glazes, the firing of the kiln was exactly how I planned… first time ever.

Got a nice gradient from about cone 12-13 in front, to cone 6-7 in the back of the first chamber, and an overall cone 6-7 in the rear chamber.

Biggest problem was crawling of iron brushwork on raw ware. I will touch up bare spots and refire these.

Lost both big slabs, which both cracked BADLY.

Madara  and E-Madara items came out really nice overall, with lots of subtle blues.

Kickwheel Conversion Finished

The kickwheel conversion is finally finished. Here are some pictures of the flywheel getting put together:

Douglas Fir beams glued up and drying.  After drying, knocked the corners off with a chainsaw, then knocked off corners again to get a basically round shape.
Douglas Fir beams glued up and drying. After drying, knocked the corners off with a chainsaw, then knocked off corners again to get a basically round shape.
Corners knocked off, planed the edge to soften and round.
Corners knocked off, planed the edge to soften and round.
Planed and sanded, ready to go on the frame.
Planed and sanded, ready to go on the frame.
Placed on the frame, spun, and centered. Then, clamped on in place, turned over and screwed in (not shown)
Placed on the frame, spun, and centered. Then, clamped on in place, turned over and screwed in (not shown)
Reassembled and ready to go!
Reassembled and ready to go!

And it was just as easy as that.  Many thanks again to Yamaguchi kun for making the flywheel armature!

And here I am taking it out for a spin: