Clay/Centipede Storage

In 2010, when we started digging the trench for the wood kiln, we found a seam of clay from about 60cm – 90cm down. This 30cm thick seam stretched as far as we dug, but with varying levels of iron. I ended up keeping a few hundred kilos of the lightest stuff, and it has been taking up space in bags that have been slowly decomposing over the last 3 – 4 years.

Finally, I rallied the gumption to get that big pile of clay moved today. First, I built an enclosure on the edge of the property behind the kiln chimney, then I started shoveling. The bags were so far gone that they just tore apart if I moved them, so there ended up being very little heavy lifting.

Scavenged  roadside construction boards.
Scavenged roadside construction boards.

I recently came into a big load of boards used by roadside crews to build temporary retaining walls. They are nice sturdy pine boards (2 1/2 inches thick) and are great for all sorts of projects, although they are not all that great looking.

I ended up just pounding in some steel stakes and tying the boards to them. I looked for some little screw-in brackets to go around the rods and onto the wood, but alas this is Taku, and none of the hardware stores had that sort of hardware.  This happens often, and my go to solution is almost always the same: stainless steel wire. It is cheap, comes in various thicknesses, and pretty much lasts forever once in place.

Stainless steel ties.
Stainless steel ties.

Once two sides were finished, I had a place to put clay, but the storage area is not quite finished. I still plan to put in  one or two dividers, so that I have 2 or 3 sections for storing different types of clay. Here is what it looks like so far:

Clay settling into its new home.
Clay settling into its new home.
Clay from the kiln trench
Clay from the kiln trench
Clay from the neighborhood reservoir
Clay from the neighborhood reservoir

The clay that is still in bags came from about 200 meters away, from the farm reservoir. We drain and muck it out once every 2 years, and that is when I discovered the clay seam.  It is not very refractory clay, but it makes very nice pots if fired to the proper temp.

During the process of moving all of this clay, I ended up killing 4, count ’em 4, centipedes , ranging from medium to gargantuan. Normally I would let them go, but lately I’ve been getting a lot of them in the workshop, and they have  a very nasty bite.