Processing Clay and Ash

In a recent massive cleaning around and in the studio, I changed things around to utilize some of the outside space more efficiently. One of the most important things is that I now, again, have a setup for processing clay and ash that I have collected and burned.

I had been getting close to finishing off my stores of collected clay that I processed some years back, time to start doing it again. I think I have a better system this time, and I have an inexhaustible supply of pine ash for now, too.

I have buckets, bags, and jars full of old collected clay and dry trimmings that need recycling. It should take some months to get it all blunged and pugged.

Collected clay that has literally been sitting around for years.
Collected clay that has literally been sitting around for years.

The Choppage ‘cho’ ‘pah’ gay’, is a traditional Korean tool for scooping off clay and other materials without disturbing everything underneath. It works much better than a ladle. I couldn’t find anyone who made them anymore, but my mentor still had one which is kindly letting me borrow.

Clay washing bucket setup, and scooping tool, called choppage.
Clay washing bucket setup, and scooping tool, called choppage.

I just agitate the material in the bottom bucket, wait, and scoop off the stuff that settles last.
Then, later after it settles in the upper bucket, I siphon the water back down into the main bucket. When enough of the upper bucket fills with material, I dump it into cloth lined basket or plaster to get out the excess water.

After returning water back into the main bucket from the 'good stuff' bucket.
After returning water back into the main bucket from the ‘good stuff’ bucket.

With the ash, the process is the same, but after I get out the good fine ash I transfer it into another bucket and wash it some more to get out the nasties. The nasties cause problems with glazing sometimes and I don’t like them. I do save the water containing the nasties for other uses.

Pine ash bucket setup, main on bottom, fine up top.
Pine ash bucket setup, main on bottom, fine up top.

The leftover rough ash stuff seems like a waste to just throw away, so I am thinking about ball milling it to see if it can be useful in some other way. We’ll see…

The leftovers after the good stuff is scooped off.
The leftovers after the good stuff is scooped off.

 

Scooping with the choppage tool.
Scooping with the choppage tool.

The sieve is 120 mesh, because I lucked into a cheap recycled sieve. I would usually use 100 mesh, so it is not much of a difference.

Dumping through sieve which is sitting on the bucket mouth.
Dumping through sieve which is sitting on the bucket mouth.