New Paddled Water Jars and Flower Vases

Here are the first of a bunch of water jars and flower vases that are going into the kiln this early fall. I really needed some practice coiling, paddling, and collaring in necks on the kickwheel and 船徳利 funadokkuri (boat flasks) are the perfect shape for it. Traditionally these were used as flasks for oil, etc. on boats. They needed to be hard to tip over, hence the wide flat bottom. Now they are mostly used for flower arrangements.

All of the water jars will have wooden lids made for them. I’ve done one or two in the past with surprising positive response from viewers/customers. The lids are fun to make, since they are a non traditional item, you can play around a bit with them. I’ll post some lids later on, if the pots make it through the firing.

3 boat flasks and one taller crane necked flask
3 boat flasks and one taller crane necked flask
water jars. any marks in the clay need to be pretty over the top, because the glaze covers them over for the most part.
water jars. any marks in the clay need to be pretty over the top, because the glaze covers them over for the most part.
lug and lip detail
lug and lip detail
more jars, a couple with 'nail heads' added, instead of lugs. You sometimes see these on tea cups and food dishes in Karatsu ware.
more jars, a couple with ‘nail heads’ added, instead of lugs. You sometimes see these on tea cups and food dishes in Karatsu ware.

IMG00698

all together now... The tallest flask is about 28cm tall,dry.
all together now… The tallest flask is about 28cm tall,dry.
Karatsu meets pueblo water jar, with kneeling, bowing tea person receiving tea. This started as a lug and sort of went bananas from there. This could be one of those things where I later slap myself.
Karatsu meets pueblo water jar, with kneeling, bowing tea person receiving tea. This started as a lug and sort of went bananas from there. This could be one of those things where I later slap myself.
Tall necked vase with two pairs of tea people bowing.
Tall necked vase with two pairs of tea people bowing.
Karatsu meets pueblo water jar. sorry for the order here...
Karatsu meets pueblo water jar. sorry for the order here…
Lug detail. I really must have wanted to drink tea that day.
Lug detail. I really must have wanted to drink tea that day.
boat flask with porcelain additions. Here's the big question: Will they pop off upon drying?
boat flask with porcelain additions. Here’s the big question: Will they pop off upon drying?
tall necked flower vase with lugs, (finally some normal ones)
tall necked flower vase with lugs, (finally some normal ones)

2 thoughts on “New Paddled Water Jars and Flower Vases”

  1. I have a question about madara Karatsu : does this glaze change in time, for example using a Madara Karatsu Yunomi with japanese green teas every day, wil it evolve ? change color ? cracken ? stains ? like it is often said “the seven changes of Hagi”…
    thank you for your answer,

  2. Hello Lionel,
    very sorry for my tardy reply. I haven’t visited or updated recently because I spent over a month on my back for a shattered femur. To answer your question: Yes! it will change over time because it is usually a crackle glaze (however, depends on the clay body). Although nearly invisible to the naked eye (a loupe will reveal them) when unloaded from the kiln, the crackle patterns will become more and more visible over time. This type of change is a bit different from a feldspar glaze (Muji Karatsu, E Karatsu, or similar Hagi ware) change, because the madara is a high silica glaze that is fired at a much higher temp. Depending on the clay, it may still absorb water and tea tannins, but will not be so visible through the transluscent or opaque madara glaze. It will be visible over time on the unglazed foot of the piece.

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